How To Make a DIY Wedding Bouquet

Are you looking for a unique and special bouquet for your wedding? Well, why not consider doing it yourself! It’s really not as hard as it seems… we promise! Just follow the easy step-by-step tutorial guide in this infographic to create a tasteful bunch of blooms for your big day!  We can’t wait to hear how it turns out (oh, and we’d love to see the pics too!). Good luck! 

How To Make a DIY Wedding Bouquet

Top 10 Tips on DIY Calligraphy For Your Wedding

We’re so excited to share this post today because, well, we’re more than just a little bit in love with calligraphy.

From the glistening of gold lettering on heavy stock card, to the sweep of pure black ink on crisp white paper, calligraphy is not only beautiful, but it demonstrates patience, style, and refinement too.

This classic art form is enjoying quite the comeback.

Seriously, we can’t get enough – Elizabeth has even been teaching herself to scribe on her travels!

And so, with our penchant for hand-scripted stationery in mind, we were over the moon to hear about Ashley Lurcott. An incredibly talented illustrator and calligrapher, Ashley creates the most stunning hand-crafted invitations and paper goods.

But eager to help DIY brides and grooms in their quest for calligraphy, she’s also created a very nifty kit called The Lettered Bride, a DIY writing set with everything you need to teach yourself calligraphy at home. Perfect!

As a self-taught calligraphy bride herself, Ashley has also kindly offered up some of her tried and tested tips for budding calligraphers. So before you pick up your quill, read on…

The Lettered Bride

I’ve always loved finding old family letters, exchanging mail with pen pals, and endlessly perusing the pen aisle at Staples. So when I got engaged last year, it seemed natural that I would decide to teach myself calligraphy to address our wedding invitations.

My calligraphy received more positive comments from our guests than any other element of our wedding! The skill itself wasn’t too difficult to learn, but finding the right tools and materials was.

I spent countless hours and dollars testing pens, nibs, and inks that were frustratingly thin or that caught on my paper, and I often wished I could just have everything I needed delivered right to my doorstep.

And so was born my idea for “The Lettered Bride,” a DIY calligraphy kit for budget-savvy brides.

With options to specify your ink color (gold, white, or black), it comes with step-by-step instructions for learning calligraphy for your wedding envelopes. 

I think calligraphy is seeing a resurgence in popularity because, in our busy digital age, we’re all craving a more personal and thoughtful touch in our correspondence. 

Calligraphy takes time, but that means you put heart and soul into it, and your guests will notice and love that. Plus, it’s a skill that extends beyond your wedding – you can use it for your holiday cards, baby showers, and other special occasions.

Top 10 Tips For DIY Wedding Calligraphy

If you have decent handwriting, are crafty, and are determined to impress your guests with a personal touch, read on for my top 10 tips for DIY-ing your wedding calligraphy!

1. Give yourself plenty of time to learn. Remember that invitations need to be sent out 6-8 weeks (or more) before your wedding.

I picked up my first pen in April and sent our invitations in July – but I also wasted a lot of time with the wrong materials, which hindered my practice. If you’re starting out with quality tools and materials, you’ll need a month or two to get the hang of it.

2. Don’t even attempt calligraphy if you have (self-proclaimed) “horrible handwriting!” Trust me, it just won’t be pretty. I’m sure you have many other lovely talents.

3. Have patience with yourself; calligraphy takes many hours of practice and lots of concentration. It can be a very meditative task, though, so plan your practice time in the early weekend mornings or as a way to “wind down” after a long day at work.

4. Don’t buy a calligraphy kit at your local art supply or book store – the inks are too thin and the nibs are usually meant for Italic and more gothic calligraphy styles.

Only “pointed” nibs give that flowy, modern look that’s so popular right now (and they also work for left-handers.)

5. Research the inks and tools that professional calligraphers use, or save time by purchasing a kit such as The Lettered Bride.

6. Learn how to properly clean your pen so that it lasts and continues to write evenly. A clogged “nib,” or pen tip, is a very frustrating thing.

7. Give your ink plenty of time to dry! There’s nothing worse than crafting a beautiful envelope, only to check it and create a smudge.

8. Wear dark clothing that you don’t care about while you write. Accidents do happen, especially if cats are nearby!

9. Order extra envelopes! Most professional calligraphers actually require brides to send them 15%-20% extra materials.

10. Don’t limit your work to envelopes. Think place cards or escort cards, table numbers, and favor-tags.
Enjoy the process and the fact that you’re creating something special that will be a cherished keepsake for a very long time!

We’re inspired.

With a bit of effort, it looks so achievable, even for lefties like me!

Vintage Mismatched China

We love the idea of using mismatched china for a DIY wedding. Perfect for a garden or vintage styled affair, this gorgeous shabby-chic trend has been popular of late and is a look which gives a wedding decor plenty of personality. You can use mismatched china and tableware for pretty guest place settings, charming wedding centrepieces or even to bring a touch of nostalgia to dessert buffet tables.

Vintage Table Settings

When designing your vintage tablescape, stick to a similar theme or colour scheme to keep the look cohesive. Start collecting your pieces early by regularly visiting local thrift and antique stores. It’s fun and often addictive to search for special pieces and you may even be lucky to find some great vintage props at the same time. Also, don’t over look family and friends as a fantastic source. Most families accumulate an assortment of mismatched china in their cupboards over time from formal dining sets. Sourcing vintage china can be very economical and you can recoup your investment when your wedding is over by renting your collection or selling it to other brides. Check out these pretty tablescapes we found using mismatched vintage china for charming DIY vintage wedding ideas.

DIY Wedding Ideas Vintage Mismatched China
Vintage Mismatched China
Wedding Mismatched Vintage China
DIY Wedding Ideas
Vintage Wedding
Vintage Mixmatched China
Vintage Wedding Theme
Vintage Wedding Table Settings
Vintage China Mismatched
Shabby Chic Wedding Ideas

Image 1: Nicole Chan Photography & Greia Marlow via Style Me Pretty / Image 2: Rustic Vintage by Ruffled Blog / Image 3: Vintage Wedding via Whimsical Wonderland Weddings / Image 4 + 5: Secret Garden Wedding Table by Cynthia Zatkin Events / Image 6: French Countryside Wedding by Jose Villa + Duet Weddings / Image 7: Mismatched Vintage Plates via Southern Living / Image 8: Eclectic Vintage Table by Brandon Kidd Photography / Image 9:  Vintage China Place Setting by Joielala Photography via The Wedding Chicks / Image 10: Retro Vintage Tablescape by A Little Loveliness / Image 11:  Vintage Wedding by Jessica Zais & Stage Right, Etc via Wedding Bells.

How To Make Handmade Fabric Flowers with Tulle

How To Make Handmade Fabric Flowers

How pretty are these tulle flowers? Well, today you’re in luck because we’re going to show you how to make these gorgeous handmade fabric flowers in a few simple steps. There are so many ways you could utilize these feminine florals. As well as a stunning hair accessory, they also make for some drop-dead gorgeous wedding details. Imagine them attached to table runners or jazzing up a bridemaid’s plain clutch?  Used to decorate wedding favours, or strung together as a whimsical ceremony banner. Absolutely lovely! 

Handmade Fabric Flowers

What You Need:

  • tulle & chiffon material*
  • piece of paper
  • scissors
  • needle and cotton
  • glass seed beads
  • plain hair clip or comb

*These fabric flowers are made using chiffon and tulle. How many metres of material you need will depend on how many flowers you make and their size, as well as the the thickness of the material used. 

Step-by-Step Tutorial:

Fabric Flowers Tutuorial

Step 1. Make the stencil first by hand drawing a rose petal shape on card then cutting out. Retrace the shape several times onto a larger sheet of paper to help create a full flower shape and even pattern. Cut out the pattern.

DIY Fabric Flowers

Step 2. Take some material and fold it into a square slightly bigger than your flower pattern. Pin the pattern to the folded material, then carefully cut around. Repeat the process until you end up with enough tulle and chiffon layers to make a full flower. In this example, 26 layers of material are used, however the number of layers you use will vary on the weight of your fabric and the size of your flower.

Handmade Fabric Flowers Tulle

Step 3. Place the cut out flower shapes on top of each other. Stagger the alignment of the petals and alternate the different materials. Use your needle and thread to secure the flower together in the centre.

How To Make Fabric Flowers

Step 4. To create volume, pinch the centre of the flower together (from underneath) and secure it with a few stitches. This will give the flower volume and a realistic shape.

Step 5. For a more glamorous look, you can sew decorative beads into the centre of the flower.

Handmade Fabric Tulle Flower

Step 6. Lastly, sew the flower securely to a hair comb or clip. Alternatively, you can tie the  flower to a corsage or sash, by sewing one or more flowers to a length of silk ribbon.

Free Printables: Cute & Creative Wedding Guest Libs

Wedding Guest Libs

Have you ever been to a wedding where you had to twiddle your thumbs for what seemed like years before the reception really got started? Well, this DIY wedding guest lib will be sure to keep your guests laughing while you sneak away for a few amazing pictures of you and your love.

As a twist on the traditional mad lib, your guests can fill out the words on one side, and then insert them into a quirky wedding story on the other side. Not only is it hilarious entertainment for them, but you can keep them to use as a fun twist on the traditional guest book (I can speak from experience to say they are priceless to read a few weeks later!).

___________________________

                    

___________________________

(click a design to save & print)

1 | Choose whether you want to have a blank heading for your own stamp, or if you like the design shown, then download & save the front & back of the guest lib by clicking the corresponding button above.

2 | Print the front design onto 5 x 7 card stock, and then flipping the card stock over to print the back. If you’ve chosen to print the design shown, there is a customizable box where you can insert your own wedding date on the heart before printing!

3 | Put a finished guest lib at each place setting with a small pencil, or you can have your guests pick one up on the way to the party. Below is how we placed them at the tables for our wedding!

DIY Wedding Guest Lib Printable
Sugar and Cloth for Love Wed Bliss

Ashley is the author and editor of Sugar & Cloth, a blog compiled of DIY projects, vintage finds, designs, recipes, and all of the pretty things in between. 

photos & designs by Sugar & Cloth, table setting photo of Ashley’s wedding by McKnight Media

How To Make Lace Mason Jars

It’s time to get crafty this weekend and what we have for you is a bunch of projects showing you how to make lace mason jars. Recently, I was contacted by one of our lovely LWB readers, who after being inspired by these Mason Jar Lighting Ideas, wanted to know how to cover a mason jar with a doily. Therefore, I knew it was time to put together a round up of easy DIY tutorials so everyone could benefit. So whether you’d like to include mason jars in your wedding decorations or just want to use them to pretty up your home, these pretty lace and doily covered numbers are bound to brighten up the atmosphere. There’s even a great little video showing how to glam up mason jars with gold paint! So get your craft box ready boys and girls, cos you’re bound to be crafting up these mason jar projects in no time!

Lace Covered Mason Jars
Lace Covered Mason Jars

A pretty DIY tutorial from Something Turquoise showing showing you how to sew (rather than glue) lace or ribbon to your mason jars.

Doily Covered Mason Jars
Doily Covered Mason Jars

Crafts by Amanda combines lace, doilies and burlap to create these pretty DIY mason jar luminaries.

Simple Lace Mason Jars
Simple Lace Mason Jars

A really simple 3 step DIY tutorial by One Wed marries chic mason jars with romantic lace and votive candles.

Paper Doily Mason Jars
Mason Jars with Paper Doilies

Another super easy DIY from Linen, Lace and Love this time covering mason jars with paper doilies.

DIY Lace Mason Jars
DIY Lace Mason Jars:  Vintage Style

ShopRuche show you how to create pretty vintage theme with these DIY lace mason jars. 

11 things humans do that dogs hate

Dogs try to be our best friends, but boy do we ever make it difficult sometimes. Here are some of the things we do that might make dogs question whether they want to remain best buds or cut ties completely
Using words more than body language
We’re a vocal species. We love to chatter away, even at our pets, who can’t understand the vast majority of what we’re saying. Dogs might be able to deduce what a few key words mean — walk, treat, toy, off — and maybe even learn hundreds of words as some border collies have done. But they can’t understand human language. What they rely on to figure out what we mean is our body language. Dogs have evolved to be expert readers of the human body and can figure out what you’re thinking and feeling before you even realize you’re thinking and feeling it. But we can easily send mixed signals if we are only paying attention to what our mouths are saying and not what our bodies are saying. If you go to any beginning dog training class, you’ll see plenty of people saying one thing, doing another, and a confused dog trying to figure out what in the world is wanted of them. For instance, telling a dog to “stay” while leaning forward toward the dog and holding out a hand like a traffic cop is, in body language, actually inviting the dog to come toward you. But when the dog does, she gets reprimanded for breaking her stay command. It’s all so confusing!
A great experiment (and something that will probably have your dog sighing with relief) is to try to spend a whole day not saying a word to your dog, but communicating only with your body. You’ll realize just how much you “talk” with your body without realizing it, how to use your movements and body position to get the response you need from your dog during training, and how involved a conversation can be without emitting a single sound.
Hugging your dog
While you might love wrapping your arms around a furry canine friend, most dogs hate hugs. We as primates think hugs are awesome and express support, love, joy and other emotions through hugs. It’s totally normal to us to wrap our arms around something and squeeze, and it only means good things. But dogs did not evolve this way. Canids don’t have arms and they don’t hug. Rather than camaraderie, if a dog places a foreleg or paw on the back of another dog, this is considered an act of dominance. No matter your intentions with hugging, a dog is hardwired to view the act of hugging as you exerting your dominance. Many dogs will tolerate it with grace — the smiling face of the family golden retriever with a child’s arms wrapped around it comes to mind. But some dogs will feel threatened, fearful, or just flat out loathe the feeling — and in fact, a child grabbing a dog for a hug is why many dog bites occur. Also, the same dog that enjoys one person's hug might react entirely differently with another family member who tries the same thing. You'd be hard-pressed to find a dog that actually enjoys or seeks out hugs.
girl hugging dog
This dog is barely tolerating a hug from the little girl. Everything about the tense mouth, eyes and ears say that this is not something the dog is enjoying, and this is a potential safety issue for the little girl. (Photo:Dwight Smith/Shutterstock)
If you’re wondering if your dog hates your hugs, just pay attention to her body language when you go in for a cuddle. Does she tense up? Lean her head away from you? Avoid even a hint of eye contact? Lick her lips? Keep her mouth closed? Pull her ears back against her head? All of these are signs that a dog is uncomfortable. Yes, even the dog licking her lips while someone snuggles her is not showing that she is overcome with love, it is showing submissive, even nervous behavior. So next time you want to go in for a hug, pay very close attention to whether or not the dog is okay with it. After all, you’re putting your face right next to a set of sharp teeth.
Petting a dog's face or patting her head
Do you like to be patted on the head? My guess is no. Having someone reach out and tap us on the head, no matter how lovingly, is not something most of us enjoy. It’s annoying at best and painful at worst. And we really don’t want the hands of strangers reaching toward our face. If someone were to reach their hand toward your face, I’m guessing your reaction would be to pull your head back and lean away, and get a little tense about the invasion of personal space. Yet most humans think that dogs like being patted on the head. The reality is that while many dogs will put up with this if it’s someone they know and trust, most dogs don’t enjoy it. You may notice that even the loving family dog might lean away slightly when you reach for her face to pet her. She’ll let you because you’re the boss, but she doesn't like it. It’s a personal space issue for dogs just as much as it is for us. This is why responsible parents teach their children to gently pet a dog’s back or rear, but don’t pat, and definitely don’t go for the dog's face. If you really want to reward your dog for being awesome, don’t bang on their head, but give them a rub on their rear end right by the tail. They’ll thank you for it!
Walking up to a strange dog while looking her in the eye
We all know how powerful eye contact is. While we view steady eye contact as important, as a sign of trustworthiness or focus, we have to also be aware that eye contact can feel unnerving, uncomfortable and domineering. It’s creepy when a stranger looks us in the eye without breaking contact, especially as they’re approaching. It’s clear their attention is zeroed in, but what is their intention? We have to read the rest of their face for the cues. Eye contact is part of establishing dominance for many species, and in humans, we can use the tiniest of details about the rest of the face — the softness or hardness of the muscles around the eyes and mouth — to determine if the stare is friendly or not. And even then, it’s still creepy to have a stranger stare at us! It feels the same way for dogs. When you look a strange dog right in the eye, unblinking, you might be smiling and trying to warm up to them but the dog is probably reading it as an act of dominance or even aggression. They might display a submissive response — looking away, doing a little wiggle for pets, rolling over onto their backs — or they might start backing up and barking. Either way, for most dogs, a stranger looking it right in the eye while approaching is not a comfortable situation.
If you want to say hello to a new dog in a way that is comfortable for both of you, approach with your body angled slightly (not with your shoulders squared toward the dog), your eyes slightly averted, and speak quietly with a gentle voice. All these body language cues of friendship will help a dog understand you mean no harm. The dog might still want nothing to do with you, but at least you didn’t approach in a scary way that could cause a defensive or aggressive reaction.
Not providing structure and rules
Dogs want, need, and love having rules. You might think having strict rules makes life boring or unhappy for your dog. But dogs really want to know what’s what according to their leader. And really, it’s not so hard to relate as humans. Children thrive when they have a consistent set of rules to follow, and they do less well in environments that provide them a free-for-all. Think about polite, well-balanced kids you know, and the spoiled kids who lack social skills or throw temper tantrums when they don’t get what they want. Which set of kids are the ones with consistently enforced rules and boundaries? And which set tends to be most consistently happy? With dogs, it’s pretty much the same thing. Rules make life a lot more predictable, a lot less confusing and a lot less stressful. 
And speaking of confusing, dogs don’t understand exceptions to rules. They don’t understand that they’re allowed to jump on you when you have leisure clothes on but not when you have work clothes on. They don’t understand that they’re allowed on the couch after a bath but not after coming in from a romp in the mud. Additionally, saying “No” for breaking a rule but not actually doing something to help the dog stop the behavior and learn the rule doesn’t count as enforcement. Dogs thrive when they know where the boundaries are, and when you spend time enforcing consistent boundaries with positive rewards, you also are building up their trust in you as a leader. You’re setting up conditions for a very happy dog!
Forcing your dog to interact with dogs or people she clearly doesn’t like
Just like so many other social species, dogs have their favorite friends and their enemies. It is easy to see what other dogs — and people, for that matter — that a dog wants to hang out with and those with whom she’d rather not associate. Yet, there are a lot of dog owners who go into denial about this or simply fail to read the cues their dog is giving them. It is common for overly enthusiastic owners to push their dog (sometimes literally) into social situations at dog parks when their dog would rather just go home. Or they allow strangers to pet their dog even when she is showing clear signs of wanting to be left alone.
It is important to note that there is a difference between positive encouragement with shy, fearful, or reactive dogs. Taking small steps to encourage them out of their comfort zone and giving them rewards for any amount of calm, happy social behavior is important to helping them live a balanced life. But knowing the difference between gentle, rewards-based boundary pushing and forcing an interaction is vital to your dog's safety and sanity. When dogs are pushed too far in social situations, they’re more likely to lash out with a bite or a fight. They’ve given cue after cue — ignoring, avoiding, maybe even growling — and finally they’ve had enough and give the clearest message of all with their teeth. What is possibly even worse, is that their trust in you as a protective leader is eroded, and they have an even more negative association with a park, a certain dog or person, or a general social setting. So do your dog a favor: read the body language she gives you when she doesn’t want to be around certain other individuals and don’t force it.
Going for walks without opportunity to explore and smell
There are walks, and there are walks. It’s definitely important to have a dog that knows how to walk obediently on a leash. However, it’s also important to allow a dog to have some time to explore her surroundings while walking obediently on a leash. Dogs see with their noses, and they place as much importance on their sense of smell as we humans place on our sense of vision for interpreting the world around us. It’s probably safe to say that dogs appreciate the smell of a tree trunk the way we appreciate a beautiful sunset. Dogs loathe not being able to take in their world for at least a few minutes a day, and too often we humans are focused on going on walks for the sole purpose of exercise or potty breaks. We trudge along the same old route, often without any variety or sense of leisure, and in too much of a hurry to get back home again.
dog smelling grass
The sense of smell is how a dog takes in the world, and sometimes they're simply desperate for a chance to take a good sniff. (Photo:Csehak Szabolcs /Shutterstock)
Do your dog a favor and dedicate one of your daily walks to having a "smell walk" — going slow and letting your dog take in the world with her nose. Go somewhere entirely new, explore a different neighborhood or trail, let your dog sniff at a spot until she gets her fill, even if it's for minutes at a time before moving forward. For helping your dog know the difference between a walk where she should be obedient and stay beside you, and a walk where she is free to explore, you can have a special backpack or harness that you use only for smell walks. Just make sure it is something very different from your usual collar and leash set-up so the different purpose for the walk is obvious to your dog. These walks are a wonderful opportunity for your dog to get some of the mental and sensory stimulation that keeps life interesting for her.
Keeping a tight leash, literally
Just as dogs are amazing at reading our body language, they’re amazing at reading our tension levels even through the leash. By keeping a tight leash on a dog, you’re raising the level of stress, frustration, and excitement for your dog, and conversely, for you. I know what you might be thinking: “I don’t want to hold a tight leash, but I have to. My dog is the one pulling, not me!” But this is why it is so important to teach a dog how to walk on a slack leash.
An amazing amount of energy is transferred between you and your dog through that little strip of canvas or leather. By keeping a loose leash, you’re letting your dog know that everything is fine and dandy, that there’s no reason to be worried or tense. With a slack leash you’re saying to your dog that you are calm and have everything under control so your dog is free to be calm as well. On the other hand, by keeping a tight leash you’re sending a message to your dog that you’re tense, nervous, on alert, ready to fight or fly, and your dog responds in kind. Just as you don’t like your dog pulling you around, it doesn’t feel good to your dog to constantly be pulled and thus cued to be on alert. They’re also well-aware that they can’t get away from you even if they think they need to. A dog that walks on a tight leash is more apt to bark or be reactive in even the most mild of social situations. But a dog that can walk on a slack leash is more likely to be calm. This is a difficult thing to master, and something the majority of dog owners can commiserate about, but it is so important to having pleasant walks with a relaxed dog.
Being tense
Tension on the leash isn’t the only way a dog can pick up how you’re feeling. You can tell when a person you’re around is feeling tense, even if you don’t realize it. Dogs have the same ability. The more stressed and wound-up you are, the more stressed and wound-up your dog is. And dogs, just like us, don’t like that feeling. You might roll your eyes, but the next time your dog is acting frustrated and tense, check in with yourself — have you been feeling that way for the last few minutes, for the last few hours, or the last few days? Your dog might just be acting as your mirror. If you need a reason to meditate, helping your dog calm down is a great one.
Being boring
You know that feeling of being stuck hanging around someone who is totally boring? Think back: remember having to be with your parents while they ran grown-up errands? None of which revolved around a toy store or park, of course. Remember that feeling of barely being able to contain yourself, of wanting to squirm and groan and complain. You couldn't take part in the adult conversation, which was boring anyway, and you were told to sit still and hush. But oh boy did you ever want to just moooove! Just run around the block or something to break the monotony. That's how your dog feels when you're busy being that boring grown-up. Dogs abhor it when we're boring. And it's hard not to be! We get home from work and we want to unwind, to get a few chores done, to make dinner and sack out on the couch and relax. But that's about the most annoying thing we could do to our dogs who have been waiting around all day for us to finally play with them.
If your dog is making trouble — getting into boxes or closets, eating shoes or chewing on table legs — she's basically showing you just how incredibly bored she is. Luckily, there is a quick and easy solution to this: training games. Teaching your dog a new trick, working on old tricks, playing a game of "find it" with a favorite toy, or going out and using a walk as a chance to work on urban agility, are all ways to stimulate both your dog's mind and body. An hour of training is worth a couple hours playing a repetitive game of fetch in terms of wearing a dog out. While of course exercise and walks are important, adding in some brain work will make your dog happy-tired. Even just 15-30 minutes of trick training a day will make a big difference.
Teasing
This should be obvious, and we won't spend too much time on it. But it's worth pointing out because too many people still think it’s funny. Don't bark at a dog as you pass it on the street. Don't wave or talk to a dog that is barking at you from behind a window or door. Don't pull on a dog's tail. The list can go on and on, but in short, don't do something you know makes a dog mad just because you think it's funny. It's not funny to the dog and can lead to some serious behavioral problems — and, perhaps deservedly, you getting to sport some new dog-shaped teeth marks.
Further Reading
If you'd like to learn more about how to be a better friend to your dog, try these great book recommendations. For example, in "The Other End of the Leash: Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs" professional behaviorist and trainer Patricia B. McConnell goes into excellent detail about the species differences between primates and canids and why dogs don't appreciate our hugs, as well as many other great ways of understanding a dog's perspective about the world. Meanwhile, in "Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know" by Alexandra Horowitz, you'll get a chance to see the world through a dog's eyes and learn so much about body language, the importance of scent, and other things that will help you know more about what your dog wants out of life. And for understanding more about how clicker training and training games can help you and your dog get along better, try "Reaching the Animal Mind: Clicker Training and What It Teaches Us About All Animals" by Karen Pryor. Follow the link for these and more great reads.